Very Little Practicality In Professional Advice

Funny. Lots of people today are getting their legal, medical, dental, and trade advice online. They are avoiding face to face professional input like the plague.

Why?

Interesting perspective from “advisers” on FOX news the last couple of days. Especially interesting when they’re giving advice for “average” people.

One, talking about a common legal predicament, the adviser said, “Get with a good lawyer for this.” It referred to something that would be ongoing. I guess the assumption is that the $300 to $500 per hour or more is just there for everybody to spend.

The other one was on health matters. The advice was to “sit down with your health care provider and …..” Really? When you see the endless complaints of people who go to their doctor for an appointment and wait 2 hours to get in?

When it takes hours to get help and hundreds of dollars for simple treatment, “sitting down” with a health care provider is not even in most people’s consideration.

I recently went to the dentist to have a crown cemented back on to a stub that had already had a root canal. The evaluation when he did it was, “We’ll probably need to do [this] and [this] and [this] which from experience I know will cost about $2000 for one tooth.

Advice from the dentist over the last few years was to begin routine “periodontal cleaning” instead of regular cleaning because of age and normal tooth and gum progression.

What does that mean? $3000 per cleaning. The finance manager actually gave me the rundown on how not starting this could result in eventual bodily degradation, including brain damage.

I cut the financial manager off with a clear verbal indication that I did not want anymore discussion with her about anything.

A couple of dental picks, a firm toothbrush, some hydrogen peroxide and some restoring mouthwash are the alternatives.

The serious necessity of being able to do it yourself:

The greatest indicator to me that “doing it yourself” is the best alternative for many people today was from the adoption of our daughter eight and a half years ago. It was a daunting process with a long, distorted legal trail that had to be traversed to make it happen.

We had to find missing fugitive relatives, a person who had died in Mexico and had to dig up all the particulars that had resulted from this winding trail from Arkansas to Texas into Mexico and back.

We did it ourselves. All our lawyer did was file the necessary papers and make the requisite court appearances that required a court officer.

The result?

An adoption that could have cost unknown thousands in investigative costs ended up costing us $450 in total legal fees. We would have given up our lives to adopt our daughter.

But the legal system doesn’t want your life. It wants your money.

And that was limited.

But we had time. We had knowledge. We had connections. We had determination. We used it all.

It resulted in the adoption of the girl that remains the love of our life.

What you better learn to do  first, is not to panic in the face of medical or legal evaluations. Get some understanding about your situation. Learn all you can about what you can do.

Then learn to take care of yourself as much as possible. Financially, the professionally provided alternatives are not available to the majority of people in the U.S.

At least not without emptying your bank accounts, maxing your credit cards and ultimately ruining your future.

Unfortunately, the word “professional” has become an excuse to charge for services in amounts far outside the ability of the majority of Americans. Somewhere there exists a reasonable medium. One that allows the professional to make a living commensurate with their training.

But also one that allows people to be able to get professional help without ruining the rest of their lives.

Conclusion: Don’t be afraid to go to legitimate sources online to find out how you can handle your own legal matters, health  and dental care, and other matters involving ponderous financial involvement. Then don’t be afraid to use that knowledge when you do have to work with a professional.